Let me out of here!

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Link to the final photograph.

Let me out of here

Animated gif with a cute toad.

Some fun from a recent photo session with a less than will model. You can see the final photograph by clicking the link.

Art PrintsArt Prints

The entire photo session lasted about 10 minutes and the little toad was released back into the garden where hopefully he will avoid the snake and eat a lot of nasty bugs.

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Middletown Connecticut Landmark O’Rourke’s Diner

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Middletown Connecticut Landmark O'Rourke's Diner

Just released from Edward M. Fielding, fine art photography. O’Rourke’s Diner, black and white photograph of the famous diner that has been the anchor of Middletown, CT’s north end of mainstreet for the past seventy years.

Shown here as a large metal print over a sofa. Metal prints are a modern way to display fine art photography without a mat and frame. The metal print sticks away from the wall about one inch so it creates an interesting shadow.

Click on the image above for a closer look. http://fineartamerica.com/featured/classic-diner-neon-sign-middletown-connecticut-edward-fielding.html

The diner, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, has been in Mr. O’Rourke’s family since the 1940s. He is known not only for his welcoming attitude but also for his cooking and has been lauded in numerous publications for his creativity.

No one knows for sure whether the steamed cheeseburger was invented in Middletown or the neighboring city of Meriden in the early 1920’s. Both lay claim to the distinction. The recipe is pretty much the same in both cities, though: Place a large patty of ground beef on a metal tray, pop it into a breadbox-sized steamer for two minutes. Add aged cheddar cheese to melt as the burger finishes steaming. Serve on a hard roll. The result is not only not soggy but also less greasy than other burgers. A few steamed cheeseburgers have been sighted outside the Meriden-Middletown area, as close as New Haven and as far away as California. Only in central Connecticut, however, are they commonplace.

A chance encounter with an American Beauty

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A chance encounter with an American Beauty

Recently I had a chance encounter with a real American beauty – a completely restored vintage 1957 Chevy Bel Air in mint condition at the beach of all places. The location was beautiful, the light was amazing (sunset) and the car was simply stunning! See more in my car portfolio on Fine Art America at: http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/edward-fielding.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=193562

Or simply click on the photograph.

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The 1957 Chevrolet is a car which was introduced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors in September, 1956. It was available in three series models: the upscale Bel Air, the mid-range “two-ten”, and the “one-fifty”. A two-door station wagon, the Nomad was produced as a Bel Air model. An upscale trim option called the “Delray” was available for two-ten 2-door sedans. It is a popular and sought after classic car. These vehicles are often restored to their original condition and sometimes modified. The car’s image has been frequently used in toys, graphics, music, movies and television. The ’57 Chevy, as it is often known, is an auto icon

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cars art
vintage car art
farm photos
vermont photos
beach photos
retro photos
 

Tips for Still Life Photographs

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Tips for Still Life Photographs

I have a passion for still lifes! They certainly are tougher then they look. Good ones look effortless. Some have suggested that they want them to look like they just happened rather than were carefully arranged.

This shot was a response after seeing the beautiful window light in one of Amy Weiss’s fantastic images.

I built this shot up with a fake background wall made of rough pine boards. The “table” is the back of an old clock. Then the wire basket with apples and the rustic plates with main apples in the front. The “hero” apples are placed in one of the golden intersections of the rule of thirds. The apples were place to reflect light in a certain way. Also I studied some old master’s paintings and noticed how much more interesting the bottom of the apple can be. Many of the paintings I checked out showed the bottom of the apple.

I think the little extra details like the dried leaves and the rough edges of the plates are what give something like this a bit of umph. Also the three largest apples form a triangle with move the viewers eye around in that bottom left region.

I used a studio light. Small softbox directly from the left. I blocked out some of the light towards the back to keep the background darker. Poster board on the right to bounce some fill light back in.

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