Framing 13×19 photographic prints

Photography

How do you frame your prints?

Modern DSLR cameras produce images in an 8×12 format which is a bit more rectangular.  In comparison an 8×10 print looks much squarer.  The tricky part is finding mats and frames for 8×12 or 13×19 which is the largest size many people’s home photo printers can produce.

Art Prints

4×5, 5×7, 8×10, these standard sizes that you would get from a photo studio or school photo day photographers are easy to find in your local Kohls, Target, Walmart or any other store that has a home decorating section.  But try to find a non-standard size and it gets trickier and expensive.

Let’s face it.  Framing outside of standard sizes gets expensive.  Rarely does one save as much money as they think they might framing it themselves.  Often it better to simply order a framed print when ordering a unique from size from my gallery.  Or ordering a canvas print.  Canvas prints are basically always made to order and the labor is less than having a mat cut and a frame made to size.

Art Prints

Where did these photographic ratios come from?

Some say that the 4 to 3 ratio comes from the printing industry. 8.5×11 inch was a common paper size even before the first photo was ever made; and goes back several centuries.  4×5 inch film was popular back in the day of large format camera including those press cameras you see in the movies.  8×10 is simply a multiple of 4×5.

35mm format is 3:2 and there are not a lot of 6×4 frames or mats out there. One solution is to shoot with cropping in mind.  Give in today’s cameras large megapixel counts, as long as you are not producing billboards, one can easily crop to fit a more standard ratio.

35mm still is 8 sprocket holes on 35mm movie film; which makes about a 24x36mm frame. “regular” movie film running vertically is 4 sprocket holes. Still 35mm cameras evolved from 35mm films used with 35mm movie cameras. Mechanically it easy easy to make the film advance an intergral number of sprocket holes. Thus 8 was used with most 35mm still cameras; one sprocket hole is 45 degrees of sprocket rotation. – Kelly Flanigan

Hip to be Square

Shooting, cropping and formatting for a square aspect ratio has a lot of advantages.  There are ready made square frames in smaller sizes like 4×4, 8×8, 10×10, with the popularity of Instagram, frame manufactures have created a lot of ready made frames for this ratio.

Art Prints

Another advantage is the square online often gets shown larger on certain websites.  Because the square is easier to layout on a page, photos are often cropped willy nilly into squares, you by creating a square yours is less likely to be cropped in a strange way when displayed in certain situations.

The downside is composing in a square format can be challenging. Square frames and mats:

Wood Frame, 14 by 14-Inch, Matted to 7-inch by 7-inch Opening, Black:
Kiera Grace Langford Wood Frame, 14 by 14-Inch, Matted to 7-inch by 7-inch Opening, Black

8×8 frame:
Malden International Designs Manhattan Matted 8×8 Black Wall Picture Frame

16×16 black frame:

Art To Frames Picture Frame, 16 by 16-Inch, Black

Framing the 13×19 Print

I recently had the chance to prints some photographs on an Epson photo printer at the arts center where I teach.  Now what to do with the output without spending an arm and a leg on custom framing.

If you print with a 1/2-inch margin all around (12×18), and then mat with 3 inches all around, you will have an 18×24 matted print, which is a stock frame size found in most art supply stores.

You can choose to frame casually without a mat (poster style) or buy a mat and then a frame.

You can get pre-cut mats here:

10 of 18×24 White Pre-cut Acid-free whitecore mat for 13×19 + back+bag

18×24 frame:

Art To Frames Picture Frame, 18 by 24-Inch, Black

13×19 Frame (no matting):
Art To Frames Picture Frame, 13 by 19-Inch, Black

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Sunflowers

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Sunflower photography by Edward M. Fielding

Sunflower photos for sale. Choose your favorite sunflower photos from thousands of available photos. All photos ship within 48 hours and include a 30-day money back satisfaction guarantee.

sunflower art

Art PrintsArt PrintsSell Art OnlineArt PrintsSell Art Online

Helianthus L. /ˌhiːliˈænθəs/[2] (sunflower) is a genus of plants comprising about 52 species[3] in the Asteraceae family, all of which are native to North America. The common name “sunflower” also applies to the popular annual species Helianthus annuus. This and other species, notably Jerusalem artichoke (H. tuberosus), are cultivated in temperate regions as food crops and ornamental plants.

 

The genus is one of many in the Asteraceae that are known as sunflowers. It is distinguished technically by the fact that the ray flowers, when present, are sterile, and by the presence on the disk flowers of a pappus that is of two awn-like scales that are cauducous (that is, easily detached and falling at maturity). Some species also have additional shorter scales in the pappus, and there is one species that lacks a pap-pus entirely. Another technical feature that distinguishes the genus more reliably, but requires a microscope to see, is the presence of a prominent, multi-cellular appendage at the apex of the style.

 

There is quite a bit of variability among the perennial species that make up the bulk of the species in the genus. Some have most or all of the large leaves in a rosette at the base of the plant and produce a flowering stem that has leaves that are reduced in size. Most of the perennials have disk flowers that are entirely yellow, but a few have disk flowers with reddish lobes. One species, H. radula, lacks ray flowers altogether.

 

The domesticated sunflower, Helianthus annuus, is the most familiar species. Perennial sunflower species are not as popular for gardens due to their tendency to spread rapidly and become invasive. Whorled sunflowers, Helianthus verticillatus, were listed as an endangered species in 2014 when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued a final rule protecting it under the Endangered Species Act. The primary threats are industrial forestry and pine plantations in Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee. They grow to six feet tall and are primarily found in woodlands, adjacent to creeks and moist, prairie-like areas.

 

sunflowers art

patent art

Formatting Artwork for Print on Demand sites

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Available on Fine Art America

Available on Fine Art America

I’ve been offering my artwork as open editions on a number of online “print on demand” sites.  These sites serve as storage for the artist’s high resolution files, to be printed as high quality Giclée or archival ink jet prints on paper, canvas, metal, acrylic and even on products such as greeting cards, pillows, phone cases and clocks.

Usually the arrange is a win win all around because it allows the artist to reach a larger audience for their work, showcase a deep catalog or portfolio (unlike at a show or gallery where one is limited by wall space).  I currently have open edition offerings on Fine Art America, Society6, RedBubble and SaattchiArt.  This are strictly unsigned, unnumbered open editions or reproductions suitable for decorating ones home.  For collectors wanting limited editions I offer them here.

So I have found Fine Art America to be the most flexible in terms of ordering a large selection of mats and frames, as well as canvases, metal prints and more.  Fine Art America was built as a front end to pictureframes.com which is the online store for Graphik Dimensions Ltd. ofHigh Point NC who have been framing artwork for artist for something like 65 years.  They do an excellent job in fulfilling the orders from Fine Art America and while you don’t get 100% customization of your artwork, it get rather close.  I’ve been inspired by a number of my customers as I get to see the final creation as orders come through Fine Art America.  For example on farm landscape was ordered with a mossy green mat and a beautiful hardwood frame.  Had I done it myself I probably stuck to the standard museum type of combination, white mat, simple black frame, but the customer’s order was an outstanding combination.  I was happy to see it done up so nicely.

Now other sites typically have less framing options.  For example Society6Society6 is a very beautifully designed website.  It really puts Fine Art America to shame with its design.  The artwork looks outstanding and everything seems hip and modern.  Society6 also stands out in terms of their product offerings.  They have some really cool products like throw pillows, laptop skins, mugs and they handcraft the items to order as they come in – all in house.  Their weakness comes in the framing department.  Unlike Fine Art America who choose to offer a dizzying array of framing options, Society6 pairs their framing and matting down to some standard sizes.  No doubt this keeps the inventory headache to a manageable level but unfortunately it leads to some weird matting of some sizes of prints.  I just started paying attention to this recently and some of the ways their back end system tries to mat my work is just horrendous.

pillow_promo

At this point I’m sworn to myself only to upload square formatted images to Society6 going forward.  They seem to be able to handle squares both in the portfolio views (squares display the largest on the pages) and in the product offerings.   Plus so many of my images look great on pillows and clocks which require a square file, so its easy to offer these along with my prints.

http://edward-fielding.artistwebsites.com/

http://society6.com/EdwardMFielding