Recent Photographs of Italy

Photography

A few photographs from my recent trip to Italy including Florence, Rome, Volterra, Lucca and the Cinque Terra region of Tuscany.

Italy Art Prints

Italy Sell Art Online

Italy Sell Art Online

Sell Art Online

Art Prints

Italy Art Prints

Italy Sell Art Online

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Ford Edsel vintage car found on the side of the road

Photography

Ford Edsel Art Online

Driving around my former hometown of East Haddam, Connecticut (one of many since I was an army brat), I came across a glorious site. Right next to formerly grand home in need of repair, parked along the railroad tracks of the Essex Steam Train and Valley Railroad and right across the street of the old train station now gift shop was this vintage beauty – a pink Ford Edsel.

The Edsel was an automobile marque that was planned, developed, and manufactured by the Ford Motor Company during the 1958, 1959, and 1960 model years. With the Edsel, Ford had expected to make significant inroads into the market share of both General Motors and Chrysler and close the gap between itself and GM in the domestic American automotive market. But contrary to Ford’s internal plans and projections, the Edsel never gained popularity with contemporary American car buyers and sold poorly. The Ford Motor Company lost millions of dollars on the Edsel’s development, manufacturing and marketing. The very word “Edsel” became a popular symbol for failure.

Ford Edsel Photography Prints

Despite the negative connotations of the Ford Edsel, it really is a beauty of a car. Decked out in all manner of extravagance from the excessive chrome, the elongated lines and distinctive shield like front grill.

I have to thank the owner for parking this beauty for me to discover.  A few days later I returned to the same spot but alas it was gone.  If there is one truism in photography it is to stop and take the shot when you see it.  Don’t expect your subject to be there the next month, next day or even the next hours.

I’ve had countless experiences where I’ve returned to a spot to find my subject moved, demolished or otherwise just gone.

More car photography featuring  Ford, Chevy, GMC and other American classic cars. http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/edward-fielding.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=193562

Classic cars in black and white – http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/edward-fielding.html?tab=artworkgalleries&artworkgalleryid=475432

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Here’s what’s been selling lately

Fine Art Photography

Fine art photography and artwork by photographer artist Edward M. Fielding sales through Fine Art America and Pixels.com. Fine Art America and Pixels.com provides the full fulfillment services for the galleries at EdwardFielding.com. The museum quality framed and matted, prints, canvases, metal prints and even fun decorative pillows and phone cases featuring the art work of fine art photographer Edward M. Fielding.

The Christmas season is always a busy time for gifts, cards as well as sprucing up the living room for company. Fine art at reasonable prices provide for great gifts to others and one’s self. The following items have been very popular this Christmas season:

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Good Photography vs. Bad Photography

Photography

vintage camera Photography Prints 

Off the top of my head I made this list of thoughts about what makes a good photograph vs a bad photograph after looking through a rather mundane portfolio of snapshots offered for sale on an online gallery.  Open for controversy, feedback and discussion!

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Good photography is clear and to the point. Painters add to the canvas, photographers subtract. In a good photograph you know the photographer took the time to eliminate distracting elements to provide a clear message. In a bad photograph you know immediately that the photographer stood in the most convenient spot or maybe never even bothered to get out of the car.

Good photography is purposeful. You know immediately why the photograph was taken.

Good photography isn’t boring. In a good photograph the photographer brings something new even to familiar subjects. Boring photographs are always taken with the same boring angle at the same boring height and aimed at the same boring subjects. “When finding the right angle for a shot…’Move your ass.’” – Jay Maisel

Good photography shows consistency. You know a good photographer when they consistently bring the goods. Each photograph in their portfolio is presented with care and attention to detail.

Good photography evokes an emotional response. Good photography grabs you deeply. Bad photography makes you wonder what attracted the photographers attention in the first place.

Good photography is selecting only the best to show. Bad photography is lulling you to sleep with every shot off the camera.

Good photography makes you want to be there, bad photography shows you places to avoid.  In other words the bad photographer takes a great dramatic place and makes it look boring.  A good photographer could take a boring place and make it look interesting.

Good photography shows the photographer got up early, stayed out late, has their camera with them always. Bad photography is the camera dusted off for vacation.

Good photography brings back a few great shots on every outing. Bad photography is the lucky shot.

Good photography is a unique vision. Bad photography is being satisfied with the same shot everyone else gets.

Good photography shows you something you never saw before or makes you stop and see something you’ve walked by a thousand times without even noticing. Bad photography shows you what you’ve seen a thousand times before. – Edward M. Fielding – http://www.edwardfielding.com

WHAT SAY YOU?

Scenes from the Canterbury Shaker Village

Fine Art Photography

Canterbury Shaker Village, Canterbury New Hampshire

There were no pulpits or decorations because those things were worldly. “In meeting, they marched, sang, danced, and sometimes turned, twitched, jerked, or shouted.

Shaker Village Photography Prints

Their buildings are very complete and in excellent order. They have a steam laundry, with mangle, and an admirably arranged ironing-room; a fine and thoroughly fitted school-house, with a melodeon, and a special music-room; an infirmary for the feeble and sick, in which there is a fearful quantity of drugs; and they take twelve or fifteen newspapers, and have a library of four hundred volumes, including history, voyages, travels, scientific works, and stories for children, but no novels.”

Shaker Village Photography Prints

“In the dwelling-house and near the kitchen I noticed a great number of buckets, hung up to the beams, one for each member, and these are used to carry hot water to the rooms for bathing. The dwellings are not heated with steam. The dining-room was ornamented with evergreens and flowers in pots.”

Shaker Village Photography Prints

The people are not great readers. The Bible, however, is much read. They are fond of music. In summer they entertain visitors at a set price, and have rooms fitted for this purpose. In the visitors’ dining-room I saw this printed notice:

At the table we wish all to be as free as at home, but we dislike the wasteful habit of leaving food on the plate. No vice is with us the less ridiculous for being fashionable.

Married persons tarrying with us overnight are respectfully notified that each sex occupy separate sleeping apartments while they remain.”

Shaker Village Art Prints

The Shakers believed God was both a man and a woman. That the fall of Adam and Eve was due to sexual intercourse and that men and women should be celibate.

shaker village Photography Prints

To see more artwork from the Canterbury Shaker Village please visit my gallery – Canterbury Shaker Village Gallery – artwork by Edward M. Fielding

Covered Bridges – Romantic or Haunting?

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The darkness of covered bridges can shield all kinds of things from watchful eyes.  A stolen kiss or perhaps something more sinister.  How do you feel as you travel under one of New Hampshire or Vermont covered bridges?  As you enter into the dark shade do you feel the romance or is there something that sends the hairs on the back of your neck on edge?  Perhaps you are too fearful of the old wooden floor boards giving way under your feet or on the look out for a car coming around the bend.

Art Prints

There are several documented haunted bridges in Vermont.

Emily’s Bridge Stowe Vermont

Located in Stowe Vermont, Gold Brook Bridge is not your ordinary covered bridge. This bridge is also known as “Emily’s Bridge,” due to the fact that it is haunted by a ghost named Emily. There are many stories of how Emily died on the bridge. One story is that she was supposed to elope with a lover who was meeting her at the bridge, and when he didn’t show, she hung herself from the rafters. Another version of this Vermont legend also starts as a love story. Emily met a man who stole her heart, and the couple made plans to marry. The fateful day arrived, and Emily went to the church in her beautiful red wedding dress ready to give herself to the gentleman in holy wedlock. The groom never arrived, and the jilted bride took the family wagon in a frenzy of anger and sorrow. She was merciless on the horses, and whipped them until they were traveling at an incredible pace, planning perhaps to confront the faithless groom. As she approached the bridge, she failed to negotiate the turn right before the bridge and drove the horses and carriage over the bank and onto the rocky brook below. Both the horses and Emily were killed in the accident. There is no written historical evidence that Emily ever existed, however. The first mention of the bridge being haunted by someone named “Emily” came after 1968 when a high school student wrote a paper on the subject claimingthat while he/she was using a Ouija board on the bridge, an entity presented itself named Emily. Other people using Ouija boards have reported that an entity has identified itself as Emily and said that she was killed on the bridge by her finance’s mother. http://www.emilysbridge.com/

One woman said she made up the story to keep her children from crossing the bridge.

Photography Prints

Why cover a bridge in the first place?

With a great abundance of timber, the earliest ones were constructed of wood and used trusses as their key structural design element. Many of the oldest bridges were built as post to pile construction, where columns called piles are used to support spans called posts. Wooden bridges lacking overhead enclosures deteriorate quickly with exposure to the elements, lasting a mere 10 to 15 years. By adding a roof to protect the structural underpinnings, builders realized bridges could stand for about 75 years. Despite having a roof serious threats including vandalism, insect damage, arson, flooding and neglect can lead to disrepair. In efforts to preserve them, bridges are renovated with steel trusses and concrete footings to increase support on the timbers.
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New Hampshire Has 54 Existing Covered Bridges

Among New Hampshire’s 54 covered bridges is the world’s longest two-span covered bridge. Shared with Vermont, the Cornish-Windsor Bridge stretches for 450 feet (137m) across the Connecticut River. You can drive through it on Route 12A, which links Cornish, N.H. and Windsor, Vt. The oldest covered bridge still in use in New Hampshire is photogenic Bath-Haverhill Bridge. Built in 1829, it crosses the Ammonoosuc River, off Route 302.

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Vermont’s 106 Covered Bridges

Not only does Vermont boast a whopping 106 covered bridges, the Vermont Covered Bridge Museum is the world’s first and only museum dedicated to this kind of structure. Find it at the Bennington Center for the Arts, near the town of Bennington. The museum features everything from bridge designers and build-your-own bridges to artwork and movies about covered bridges. And, Bennington County itself has five bridges that are still in use.

Photography Prints

Middletown Connecticut Landmark O’Rourke’s Diner

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Middletown Connecticut Landmark O'Rourke's Diner

Just released from Edward M. Fielding, fine art photography. O’Rourke’s Diner, black and white photograph of the famous diner that has been the anchor of Middletown, CT’s north end of mainstreet for the past seventy years.

Shown here as a large metal print over a sofa. Metal prints are a modern way to display fine art photography without a mat and frame. The metal print sticks away from the wall about one inch so it creates an interesting shadow.

Click on the image above for a closer look. http://fineartamerica.com/featured/classic-diner-neon-sign-middletown-connecticut-edward-fielding.html

The diner, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, has been in Mr. O’Rourke’s family since the 1940s. He is known not only for his welcoming attitude but also for his cooking and has been lauded in numerous publications for his creativity.

No one knows for sure whether the steamed cheeseburger was invented in Middletown or the neighboring city of Meriden in the early 1920’s. Both lay claim to the distinction. The recipe is pretty much the same in both cities, though: Place a large patty of ground beef on a metal tray, pop it into a breadbox-sized steamer for two minutes. Add aged cheddar cheese to melt as the burger finishes steaming. Serve on a hard roll. The result is not only not soggy but also less greasy than other burgers. A few steamed cheeseburgers have been sighted outside the Meriden-Middletown area, as close as New Haven and as far away as California. Only in central Connecticut, however, are they commonplace.

Tips for Still Life Photographs

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Tips for Still Life Photographs

I have a passion for still lifes! They certainly are tougher then they look. Good ones look effortless. Some have suggested that they want them to look like they just happened rather than were carefully arranged.

This shot was a response after seeing the beautiful window light in one of Amy Weiss’s fantastic images.

I built this shot up with a fake background wall made of rough pine boards. The “table” is the back of an old clock. Then the wire basket with apples and the rustic plates with main apples in the front. The “hero” apples are placed in one of the golden intersections of the rule of thirds. The apples were place to reflect light in a certain way. Also I studied some old master’s paintings and noticed how much more interesting the bottom of the apple can be. Many of the paintings I checked out showed the bottom of the apple.

I think the little extra details like the dried leaves and the rough edges of the plates are what give something like this a bit of umph. Also the three largest apples form a triangle with move the viewers eye around in that bottom left region.

I used a studio light. Small softbox directly from the left. I blocked out some of the light towards the back to keep the background darker. Poster board on the right to bounce some fill light back in.

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