For the love of peony

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Art Prints

Peony’s have to be my favorite flower.  Huge blossoms, wide variety of styles – double, fancy, they have an antique look to them that looks great in still life photographs.  The plants themselves look great as foliage and especially as a small hedge row.  They can be divided but they don’t like to be moved around, often they can take up to two years to bloom after being moved.

Photography Prints

The peony is named after Paeon (also spelled Paean), a student of Asclepius, the Greek god of medicine and healing. Asclepius became jealous of his pupil; Zeus saved Paeon from the wrath of Asclepius by turning him into the peony flower.

Art Prints

Herbaceous and Itoh peonies are propagated by root division, and sometimes by seed. Tree peonies can be propagated by grafting, division, seed, and from cuttings, although root grafting is most common commercially.[13] [14]

Herbaceous peonies such as Paeonia lactiflora, will die back to ground level each autumn. Their stems will reappear the following spring. However tree peonies, such as Paeonia suffruticosa, are shrubbier. They produce permanent woody stems that will lose their leaves in winter but the stem itself remains intact above ground level. How you plant your peony will depend on which type you have.

Photography Prints

 

Diane Arbus – Documentary, 1972

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Masters of photography Diane Arbus (documentary, 1972) from Foto Parangolé on Vimeo.

Going Where I’ve Never Been: The Photography of Diane Arbus

The work of photographer Diane Arbus as explained by her daughter, friends, critics, and in her own words as recorded in her journals. Illustrated with many of her photographs. Mary Clare Costello, narrator Themes: Arbus’ quirky go-it-alone approach. Her attraction to the bizarre, people on the fringes of society: sexual deviants, odd types, the extremes, styles in questionable taste, poses and situations that inspire irony or wonder. Where most people would look away she photographed.
– Written by Stephan Chodorov, writer

This Weeks Limited Time Offer

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Each week I’m offering a limited time offer on a canvas print from Fine Art America.  No coupon is required.  Special prices on a specific size, limited to 25 buyers and offered for only 5 days.

This week’s limited time canvas print offering is on the popular “Old Tractor” sepia toned print.  An 11×14 canvas is only $50 during this special promotion.

LINK TO THE LIMITED TIME OFFER

About Canvas Prints on Fine Art America:

Bring your artwork to life with the texture and depth of a stretched canvas print!   Your image gets printed on one of our premium canvases and then stretched on a wooden frame of 1.5″ x 1.5″ stretcher bars.

Portrait of an old farm tractor in Etna, New Hampshire. Sepia toned for a vintage look.
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Photograph by Edward M. Fielding – http://www.edwardfielding.com
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This old tractor comes to visit a meadow near my home twice a summer to cut the hay. Who knows how long this old work horse has been in service. These machines sit outside in the weather half the time but they seem to live forever.
…..
So, out back lie iron hunks of metal
That once was the heart of the farm.
Tractors and old trucks in their former glory
Just waiting to be restored and remind us of their story.

Part of a poem by Cindy Ladage – http://www.cowboypoetry.com/cindyladage.htm

William Eggleston: Master of Photography

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William Eggleston: Master of Photography from Video Uploader on Vimeo.

He shot color film during a time when his peers were all shooting black and white. His icon images of the U.S.A. are still used to day on record albums and shown in museums.

William Eggleston (born July 27, 1939), is an American photographer. He is widely credited with increasing recognition for color photography as a legitimate artistic medium to display in art galleries.

Artists – Learn to Love Rejection

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Fine Art Photography

I’ve seen a lot of blogs about “dealing with rejection” but not much on the healthful benefits of rejection. Rejection is part of the equation between you, your creative endeavor and the world at large. There simply is not enough demand for art, photography, writing, acting, quilting or whatever to go around so filters are there between you and success. Be it editors, curators, accountants, or directors – these filters or gatekeepers are there to weed through all of the stuff and decide what makes it through. Everything else is rejected.

Now of course these gatekeepers are not perfect and the worth of creative work is subjective but it exists and artist have two basic ways to “deal with it”. 1. Get mad and say “they don’t know good work when they see it and storm off or 2. Learn from the rejection.

What you don’t do is take it personally. 99% of people need to be rejected for these gatekeepers before they find what they want. That means plenty of great work is going to be rejects. There are countless stories of bestsellers being rejected by publishers or TV scripts like The Walking Dead being passed over by one network only to become super successful on another. If you are passionate about your work and truly believe in it then you’ll learn that perhaps you haven’t approached the right venue or it or your timing was off. No need to take it personal, just keep at it.

Now on the other hand if the work is returned with some helpful comments, then it might benefit you to explore those ideas. Because you have the opportunity for constructive feedback from an expert in the field. Personally I cut my teeth on producing stock photography. In the beginning my acceptance rate was about 10%. I just didn’t have the skills needed and didn’t fully grasp what the stock photography buyers were looking for — eventually my skills improved as well as my eye. Instead of wandering around trying to find stock images, I started planning them out and creating them. Eventually over time my acceptance rate grew to 90% and I started getting accepted at more prestigious stock agencies. My technical skills grew with every rejection to the point that my artistry grew.

No one can grow as an artist without feedback and rejection can be a form of feedback that is important for artistic growth. No one likes rejection but if one can learn from it, it will only help to improve ones work.

Canvas Prints by Edward M. Fielding now available in the UK

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http://www.photo4me.com/canvasprints/edward-fielding

Our new partner, Photo4me offers exceptional canvas prints for UK buyers.

About our Canvases

Canvas Paper
We use 270 GSM cotton polyester mix
Chunky frames
There is nothing worse than ordering a canvas frame from an online shop to find that when it arrives they have used very flimsy framing. Our frames are 44mm thick as standard.

Frame work
The profile is carefully cut at an angle of 75 degrees ensuring that the canvas stretches easily over the frame. Corners are accurately mitred, then they are glued and double screwed to provide an exceptionally strong joint. Other Information Two layers of frame tape to finish of the back

Ready to hang All our canvases come with metal hangers attached, so the most taxing thing to do after receiving your canvas is opening the box and choosing the right spot to display it.


Vibrant colours
All our prints are printed using HP’s latest technology. We use a Designjet Z3100 along with HP Vivera Pigment inks which are specially designed to work with HP papers producing the best quality, reliability and fade resistance when used together. We use a high quality bright white, seedless, water-resistant canvas with a matte pronounced textured surface that has excellent colour intensity and colour gamut volume. – See more at: http://www.photo4me.com/whyus.aspx#sthash.5o4ySl0m.dpuf

About our Canvases

Canvas Paper
We use 270 GSM cotton polyester mix
Chunky frames
There is nothing worse than ordering a canvas frame from an online shop to find that when it arrives they have used very flimsy framing. Our frames are 44mm thick as standard.

Frame work
The profile is carefully cut at an angle of 75 degrees ensuring that the canvas stretches easily over the frame. Corners are accurately mitred, then they are glued and double screwed to provide an exceptionally strong joint. Other Information Two layers of frame tape to finish of the back

Ready to hang All our canvases come with metal hangers attached, so the most taxing thing to do after receiving your canvas is opening the box and choosing the right spot to display it.


Vibrant colours
All our prints are printed using HP’s latest technology. We use a Designjet Z3100 along with HP Vivera Pigment inks which are specially designed to work with HP papers producing the best quality, reliability and fade resistance when used together. We use a high quality bright white, seedless, water-resistant canvas with a matte pronounced textured surface that has excellent colour intensity and colour gamut volume. – See more at: http://www.photo4me.com/whyus.aspx#sthash.5o4ySl0m.dpuf

About our Canvases

Canvas Paper
We use 270 GSM cotton polyester mix
Chunky frames
There is nothing worse than ordering a canvas frame from an online shop to find that when it arrives they have used very flimsy framing. Our frames are 44mm thick as standard.

Frame work
The profile is carefully cut at an angle of 75 degrees ensuring that the canvas stretches easily over the frame. Corners are accurately mitred, then they are glued and double screwed to provide an exceptionally strong joint. Other Information Two layers of frame tape to finish of the back

Ready to hang All our canvases come with metal hangers attached, so the most taxing thing to do after receiving your canvas is opening the box and choosing the right spot to display it.


Vibrant colours
All our prints are printed using HP’s latest technology. We use a Designjet Z3100 along with HP Vivera Pigment inks which are specially designed to work with HP papers producing the best quality, reliability and fade resistance when used together. We use a high quality bright white, seedless, water-resistant canvas with a matte pronounced textured surface that has excellent colour intensity and colour gamut volume. – See more at: http://www.photo4me.com/whyus.aspx#sthash.5o4ySl0m.dpuf

About our Canvases

Canvas Paper
We use 270 GSM cotton polyester mix
Chunky frames
There is nothing worse than ordering a canvas frame from an online shop to find that when it arrives they have used very flimsy framing. Our frames are 44mm thick as standard.

Frame work
The profile is carefully cut at an angle of 75 degrees ensuring that the canvas stretches easily over the frame. Corners are accurately mitred, then they are glued and double screwed to provide an exceptionally strong joint. Other Information Two layers of frame tape to finish of the back

Ready to hang All our canvases come with metal hangers attached, so the most taxing thing to do after receiving your canvas is opening the box and choosing the right spot to display it.


Vibrant colours
All our prints are printed using HP’s latest technology. We use a Designjet Z3100 along with HP Vivera Pigment inks which are specially designed to work with HP papers producing the best quality, reliability and fade resistance when used together. We use a high quality bright white, seedless, water-resistant canvas with a matte pronounced textured surface that has excellent colour intensity and colour gamut volume. – See more at: http://www.photo4me.com/whyus.aspx#sthash.5o4ySl0m.dpuf

Options for UK Buyers

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Options for UK Buyers

Collectors from the United Kingdom now have a new choice for purchasing artwork by Edward M. Fielding.  Buying artwork via Fine Art America can be cost prohibitive for overseas customers except for rolled artwork, so I’ve opened a portfolio with Photo4me a UK based print on demand firm.

Why buy Edward M. Fielding artwork from Photo4me?

The profile is carefully cut at an angle of 75 degrees ensuring that the canvas stretches easily over the frame. Corners are accurately mitred, then they are glued and double screwed to provide an exceptionally strong joint. Other Information Two layers of frame tape to finish of the back

Ready to hang All our canvases come with metal hangers attached, so the most taxing thing to do after receiving your canvas is opening the box and choosing the right spot to display it.

– See more at: http://www.photo4me.com/whyus.aspx#sthash.fPY07maB.dpuf

270 GSM cotton polyester mix

Ansel Adams on Previsualization

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You don’t take a photograph, you make it.”
― Ansel Adams

In this rare clip, Ansel Adams talks about the concept of pre-visualization. Seeing an image in its final form before snapping the shutter.

A photographer truly becomes an artist when they move from operating by luck and happenstance, shooting hundreds of snapshots – hoping a couple of them come out great to in the words of Adams “making photographs instead of taking photographs”.

When a photographer truly masters the craft of photography – camera operations, post-processing etc and moves to a higher level of artistry – actually seeing and per-conceiving what they want to express as their artistic vision do the enter the realm of a true artist.

Snapping a bunch of random photos is not a well thought out artistic vision. Adams was a true master of his craft from being able to judge exposure simply by eyeing the scene to knowing how to bring out the best in the darkroom. The craft comes first and then the artistry becomes possible from one’s command of the mechanics of photographs.

“A great photograph is one that fully expresses what one feels, in the deepest sense, about what is being photographed.”
― Ansel Adams

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As an example I’ll offer this photograph from my portfolio. A lot of my work is intended for the book cover market so I seek out and create image that have a bit of moody, atmospheric quality to them. Images in which something might happen, already happened or perhaps is about to happen.

I took a location scouting trip to a new spot recently. I found this small reservoir with this tiny kids picnic table beside the water. The day we went it was a bright sunny day with harsh shadows. Not the look I wanted to so I filed the location away in my “overcast days” file. Luckily I didn’t have to wait long for a dark, overcast day, so I returned and composed the shot for a possible book cover use with plenty of copy space above the subject. I also used a short depth of field to muddy out the background and in post-processing added some eerie tones. As a result this typically happy place where kids probably go fishing with grandpa, now has a uneasy feeling of perhaps a crime is about to be committed for a detective to solve.

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